Keyword: Implementing disaster response

Implementing disaster response


This icon and keyword combination represent Implementing disaster response. The related sub-sections are listed below.


3.0

Summary of key actions

The following table summarises the key actions that should be taken in the first 72 hours following a sudden onset disaster, or following a recognised spike (as assessed by the member/country programme and/or IHART) in a slow onset disaster. A fuller description of each activity is included in the text below. The RASCI matrix sets out in detail the roles that individuals and departments across the organisation are expected to play, and where accountability lies for each activity. The key point to remember is that during disasters, it cannot be ‘business as usual’ – different ways of working and different priorities will be needed.

In case of red and orange alert level emergencies, the ActionAid standard operating procedure (SOP) expects members/country programmes to respond. However, in yellow alert level emergencies, members/country programmes are advised to respond. This section defines expectations of IHART in such circumstances.

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4.0

Summary of key actions

The following table summarises the key actions that should be taken in the first month. A fuller description of each activity is included in the text below. The RASCI matrix sets out in detail the roles that individuals and departments across the organisation are expected to play, and where accountability lies for each activity.

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4.1

Implementing disaster response

Conduct a detailed needs assessment

Who does this: member/country programme, with support from IHART

The purpose of a needs assessment is to gather detailed information about the disaster and the impact on the communities that ActionAid works with. The needs assessment is different to the rapid assessment conducted in the first 72 hours after the disaster. The needs assessment collects more detailed information on the impact of the disaster and the needs of the affected communities. This usually begins from week one of the crisis and should be completed four weeks after the crisis has begun. It will determine the scale and type of ActionAid’s response to the disaster and will directly inform the Emergency Response and Resilience Building Plan. The needs assessment is also essential for developing credible funding proposals to donors.

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5.0

Summary of key actions

The following table summarises the key actions that should be taken around six months after the disaster. A fuller description of each activity is included on the following pages.

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5.2

Implementing disaster response

Integrate ERRP into longer term programmes and strategies

Who does this: member/country programme, with support from IHART

Disasters are not one-off events, and ActionAid’s disaster response should contribute to building community resilience to future disasters. To do this, it is important that the disaster response is integrated into the member/country programme’s ongoing work.

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