Keyword: Management response

Management response


This icon and keyword combination represent Management response. The related sub-sections are listed below.


3.0

Summary of key actions

The following table summarises the key actions that should be taken in the first 72 hours following a sudden onset disaster, or following a recognised spike (as assessed by the member/country programme and/or IHART) in a slow onset disaster. A fuller description of each activity is included in the text below. The RASCI matrix sets out in detail the roles that individuals and departments across the organisation are expected to play, and where accountability lies for each activity. The key point to remember is that during disasters, it cannot be ‘business as usual’ – different ways of working and different priorities will be needed.

In case of red and orange alert level emergencies, the ActionAid standard operating procedure (SOP) expects members/country programmes to respond. However, in yellow alert level emergencies, members/country programmes are advised to respond. This section defines expectations of IHART in such circumstances.

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3.3

Management response

As the disaster response progresses, the country programme will develop an Emergency Response and Resilience Building Plan (ERRP). This is described in section 4. However, there are certain processes and systems that need to be put in place in the first 72 hours to make sure that the programme is effective.

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4.0

Summary of key actions

The following table summarises the key actions that should be taken in the first month. A fuller description of each activity is included in the text below. The RASCI matrix sets out in detail the roles that individuals and departments across the organisation are expected to play, and where accountability lies for each activity.

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4.2

Management response

Implement key management processes

Who does this: members/country programme


Human resource management

  • HR is part of the programme and is included in the response plan. The HR plan should be developed based on prior analysis included in the HR section of the country level preparedness plan.

  • Staff should be deployed or recruited to meet all requirements of the programme to enable an effective response – national EFAST and volunteers should be included as part of the structure (see Section 2)

  • As a signatory to People in Aid, ActionAid will utilise the principles and guidelines outlined by People in Aid, specifically regarding fast-track recruitment, rest and recuperation, psychosocial support for staff and on-the-job coaching.

    Information on the People In Aid Principles can be found in Section 7 – Accountability.

  • ActionAid has worked with a group of different INGOs to develop a Humanitarian Core Competencies Framework which describes the important competencies and behaviours required by humanitarian workers. This should be used when developing job descriptions, interview questions and assessing job performance.

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5.0

Summary of key actions

The following table summarises the key actions that should be taken around six months after the disaster. A fuller description of each activity is included on the following pages.

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